This Week in Reference: Research Marches On

Jackson Pollock, The Key, 1946, Collection of the Art Institute of Chicago

We are inspired by DePaul students and faculty who continue to pursue their research interests and discover new ideas, even as we confront disruption and uncertainty during current events. We miss seeing you in the library, but it is encouraging to know that from couches, kitchen tables, and makeshift desks, your academic research continues at DePaul.

As always, librarians are here to help with all your research needs. Though we are not physically located in the library buildings, we are providing high quality research help via instant messaging, email, and Zoom. Our expert researchers can help you find the best articles, ebooks, images, statistics, or other materials for your spring quarter papers and projects. Here are some of the topics we’ve helped research in the past few weeks:

Positive reinforcement in teaching and parenting 

Upton Sinclair’s 1934 California gubernatorial campaign

Indigenous Middle Eastern minorities living in America

Criticism of Mother Teresa

Use of smartphone apps by blue collar workers

Study guides for City of Chicago civil service employment exams

Analysis of Jackson Pollock’s painting “The Key” at the Art Institute of Chicago

Advocating for sex work decriminalization in Illinois

The history of the portrayal of women on television, specifically I Love Lucy 

Hereditary factors versus lifestyle factors for African Americans with diabetes

Legality and history of physician-assisted suicide in Finland

 

Question:

Hi there! I’m just wondering if you have any scholarly articles that focus on homeless shelters.  Is there anything specific about how the addition of homeless shelters have positively improved the lives of those who are homeless? 

Answer:

Let’s try one of our most popular databases, Academic Search Complete. Be sure to limit to Scholarly (Peer reviewed) journals on the left side of the page. In the first search box, type homeless*. In the second search box, type shelter* OR housing. In the third search box, outcome* OR benefit*. The use of asterisks allows us to include every variation of the word in our search results (for example, a search for outcome* yields results including outcome and outcomes). 

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