Author: Sue Shultz

Supporting Academic Success: A Workshop about Open Educational Resources and Affordable Course Materials

The Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois (CARLI) invites DePaul faculty and instructors to attend a virtual workshop about open educational resources (OER). If you are concerned about the cost of course materials for your students, attend this workshop to become familiar with open textbooks and how they

Faculty Select: A New Library Database to Help you Select Materials for Upcoming Courses

Spring quarter 2021 will mark the one-year anniversary of the move to online delivery of most courses at DePaul University due to COVID-19. While this has created challenges for faculty and students, it has also been an opportunity for increased adoption of electronic books (e-books) and open educational resources (OER).

COVID-19 and Affordability Challenges: Support Students with Open Educational Resources (OERs) and Library Resources

It has been a collective effort and learning experience for all of us to quickly transition to a fully online spring quarter due to COVID-19. One of the early lessons for the library was the realization that students who cannot afford to purchase course materials have become even more vulnerable.

Image: opensource.com

Open Educational Resources: Reduce Cost and Enhance Learning

The steady increase in awareness, adoption and creation of open educational resources (OERs) over the past decade demonstrates that faculty and administrators across the globe are concerned about the high cost of textbooks and course materials. Higher education institutions, as well as government organizations, not-for-profits and consortiums, report that OERs

Open Education Week 2019

Open Education Week March 4-8

This year for Open Education Week the Library is hosting screenings of the documentary Paywall: The Business of Scholarship at both the Lincoln Park and Loop campuses.  Paywall investigates the impact of restrictions imposed by the publishing industry on access, or lack thereof, to research.  This is an increasingly important issue both for faculty